About Fred Hain

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So far Fred Hain has created 34 blog entries.

Elevated light levels reduce hemlock woolly adelgid infestation and improve carbon balance of infested eastern hemlock seedlings

The title says it all: "Elevated light levels reduce hemlock woolly adelgid infestation and improve carbon balance of infested eastern hemlock seedlings." The full story authored by S.T. Brantley and colleagus is published in Forest Ecology and Management, volume 385, pages 150-160.

By | December 8th, 2016|News|Comments Off on Elevated light levels reduce hemlock woolly adelgid infestation and improve carbon balance of infested eastern hemlock seedlings

Newsletters

file:///C:/Users/Hain/Desktop/My%20Documents/FRA/FRA%20newsletters/FRA%20combined%20newsletters.pdf

By | December 6th, 2016|Bird's Eye View|Comments Off on Newsletters

Fitness and physiology of HWA in relation to the health of host tree

Studies have shown that once healthy hemlocks become infested by HWA, nutrients are depleted from the tree, leading to both tree decline and a reduction of the adelgid population. Since HWA is dependent on hemlock for nutrients, feeding on trees in poor health may affect the ability of the insect to obtain necessary nutrients and may [...]

By | November 30th, 2016|News|Comments Off on Fitness and physiology of HWA in relation to the health of host tree

Hemlocks on Lee Stand Still Healthy

The Lee stand in Wilkes County, NC has been infested with hemlock woolly adelgids for at least 7 years, yet the trees still look healthy. This is one of the most promising sites we have for a source of potentially resistant or tolerant hemlocks to the adelgids. Below are recent photos of trees #3 and [...]

By | November 8th, 2016|News|Comments Off on Hemlocks on Lee Stand Still Healthy

Destructive invasive species threatens Ottawa County hemlock trees

Hemlock woolly adelgid, an invasive species native to east Asia, is a tiny insect that consumes the sap of hemlock trees. According to the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, the insect is responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of hemlock trees in eastern states. Read more: http://www.hollandsentinel.com/news/20161003/destructive-invasive-species-threatens-ottawa-county-hemlock-trees

By | October 14th, 2016|News|Comments Off on Destructive invasive species threatens Ottawa County hemlock trees

Losing most of Michigan’s eastern hemlock resource is a real possibility

An insect responsible for the loss of much of the eastern United States Appalachian region’s hemlock trees has found its way into Michigan. The hemlock woolly adelgid poses a threat to the state’s valuable hemlock stands. We need a call to action. Read more: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/losing_most_of_michigans_ eastern_hemlock_resource_is_a_real_possibility

By | October 4th, 2016|News|Comments Off on Losing most of Michigan’s eastern hemlock resource is a real possibility

Forest Health Research and Education Center Shares $3 Million NSF Grant

The Forest Health Research and Education Center (Forest Health Center), a collaborative project among the Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), the University of Kentucky, and the Kentucky Division of Forestry, will share a $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation with researchers from Washington State University (serving as lead), the University of Tennessee, [...]

By | September 23rd, 2016|News|Comments Off on Forest Health Research and Education Center Shares $3 Million NSF Grant

An Army of Beetles Could Help Save Dying Hemlock Forests

BENT CREEK EXPERIMENTAL FOREST, N.C. — When the woolly adelgids come and descend on the forest, the eastern hemlock dies. It’s been like this since the insect was discovered in Virginia in 1951. The aphid-like pest spread north first, but by the early 2000s, eastern hemlocks in the southern Appalachians were being decimated by the [...]

By | September 16th, 2016|News|Comments Off on An Army of Beetles Could Help Save Dying Hemlock Forests

An Army of Beetles Could Help Save Dying Hemlock Forests

BENT CREEK EXPERIMENTAL FOREST, N.C. — When the woolly adelgids come and descend on the forest, the eastern hemlock dies. It’s been like this since the insect was discovered in Virginia in 1951. The aphid-like pest spread north first, but by the early 2000s, eastern hemlocks in the southern Appalachians were being decimated by the [...]

By | September 16th, 2016|Uncategorized|Comments Off on An Army of Beetles Could Help Save Dying Hemlock Forests

HEMLOCK A Forest Giant on the Edge

HEMLOCK A Forest Giant on the Edge  by David R. Foster editor. Yale University Press, 2014 I had never thought of eastern hemlock as a forest giant until I visited the mountains of western North Carolina. In my northern New England experience, an old-growth hemlock was a good-sized tree, often equal in girth to eastern white [...]

By | August 27th, 2016|News|Comments Off on HEMLOCK A Forest Giant on the Edge