If some hemlock trees can just hang on, birds that need them may be OK

"Still, we had a lot of these hemlock-associated bird species hanging around. So on a local scale where we are managing, like in a national park, for example, if we can keep enough hemlocks alive, they don't necessarily have to be that healthy. And if we have just a few hemlocks but we invest heavily [...]

By | May 9th, 2017|News|Comments Off on If some hemlock trees can just hang on, birds that need them may be OK

Beetles Making Difference in Woolly Adelgid Fight at Pennsylvania Park

Almost 20 years after the woolly adelgid arrived at Nay Aug Park and started threatening the hemlocks in and around the gorge, officials believe they’ve finally gained the upper hand against the invasive, tree-killing pest, thanks in large part to a predatory beetle called S. tsugae. Read more: http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/beetles-making-difference-in-woolly-adelgid-fight-at-nay-aug-park-1.2180821

By | April 21st, 2017|News|Comments Off on Beetles Making Difference in Woolly Adelgid Fight at Pennsylvania Park

Sandburg Home ramps up hemlock woolly adelgid fight

Tiny bugs with big appetites are the latest hope for the hemlocks at Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site. Resource managers at the 264-acre National Park Service site in Henderson County have released more than 700 predatory beetles – known as Laricobius nigrinus – to help in the fight against the hemlock woolly adelgid. Read more: http://www.citizen-times.com/story/news/local/2017/04/07/sandburg-home-ramps-up-hemlock-woolly-adelgid-fight/100128974/

By | April 14th, 2017|News|Comments Off on Sandburg Home ramps up hemlock woolly adelgid fight

Team predicts increasing decline of hemlock as winters warm

Today, an estimated 26 percent of the region's hemlock stands are at high risk. As winters get warmer, the decline will increase, with 43 percent of stands expected to be at high risk. Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-team-decline-hemlock-winters.html#jCp

By | April 7th, 2017|News|Comments Off on Team predicts increasing decline of hemlock as winters warm

Hemlock Seed Banking

Eastern and Carolina hemlock trees in more than 400 counties across 19 states are dead, dying, or threatened by infestation of the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid. As the aphid-like pest continues to spread throughout the ranges of these economically and ecologically important trees, scientists, managers, and other specialists from North Carolina State University’s (NCSU) Camcoreprogram are [...]

By | March 23rd, 2017|News|Comments Off on Hemlock Seed Banking

Sap-sucking Bugs Threaten Hemlock Forests

Sap-sucking insects called hemlock woolly adelgids are draining the life from a common evergreen tree in the eastern United States. Since arriving from Japan in the 1950s, the tiny bugs have spread from Georgia to Maine—about half of the Eastern hemlock’s range. Once the bugs become well-established, the consequences can be grave. Areas with severe [...]

By | February 6th, 2017|News|Comments Off on Sap-sucking Bugs Threaten Hemlock Forests

Invasive species pose risk to Tennessee homeowners and forests

The fight to protect East Tennessee's forests — and cities — from an invasive species continues expanding. The emerald ash borer has been found in 47 of the state's 95 counties, while 40 counties are know to be infested with the Hemlock woolly adelgid. Read more: http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/local/story/2017/jan/25/tennessee-forests-challenged-emerald-ash-bore/409355/

By | February 6th, 2017|News|Comments Off on Invasive species pose risk to Tennessee homeowners and forests

Ben Smith Featured in CALS Newsletter

At the Mountain Research Station in Waynesville, N.C., postdoctoral researcher Ben Smith patiently tends thousands of evergreen seedlings. His goal: to find at least a few that will tolerate two tiny but troublesome pests. Read more: https://cals.ncsu.edu/news/far-from-being-futile-resistance-is-this-tree-breeders-goal/

By | January 1st, 2017|News|Comments Off on Ben Smith Featured in CALS Newsletter

White House wants researchers to focus on curbing invasives

The White House wants researchers to focus on curbing the impact invasive plants, animals and insects have on the U.S. environment and economy. With just a few weeks until his term ends, President Barack Obama signed an executive order committing to prevent the “economic, plant, animal, ecological and human health impacts that invasive species cause.” For instance, a [...]

By | January 1st, 2017|News|Comments Off on White House wants researchers to focus on curbing invasives

Climate change strengthens an army of forest-eating insects

Hemlock woolly adelgids aren't native to North America, but droves of them have settled into American forests where they threaten entire ecosystems. Read more: http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2016/1209/Climate-change-strengthens-an-army-of-forest-eating-insects

By | December 19th, 2016|News|Comments Off on Climate change strengthens an army of forest-eating insects