American Forest Foundation Blog has article about hemlock woolly adelgid

A silent killer is blazing a trail through the Appalachians, leaving countless dead hemlocks in its wake. The assassin is a tiny invasive insect from Japan, the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA). It is stealthy and brutal, causing 80-90 percent mortality of eastern and Carolina hemlocks. Many fear the loss of these ecologically significant and charismatic [...]

By | February 17th, 2012|News|Comments Off on American Forest Foundation Blog has article about hemlock woolly adelgid

Robert Jetton and Fred Hain Receive Funding from the US Forest Service to Conduct Research on Infestation Techniques and Variation in Adelgid Susceptibility in Hemlock

In June of 2011, Robert Jetton (NCSU Camcore) and Fred Hain (NCSU Department of Entomology) received a $45,040 grant from the US Forest Service Southern Research Station for a new research project titled, “Evaluating Techniques for Artificially Infesting Hemlocks (Tsuga spp.) with the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) and Assessing Variation in Adelgid Susceptibility Among Carolina [...]

By | August 24th, 2011|News|Comments Off on Robert Jetton and Fred Hain Receive Funding from the US Forest Service to Conduct Research on Infestation Techniques and Variation in Adelgid Susceptibility in Hemlock

Reclaiming Hemlocks and Firs: A Symposium

The Alliance for Saving Threatened Forests (ASTF) is hosting a one-day (9a.m.-5p.m.) symposium reporting on host resistance research to the hemlock and balsam woolly adelgids.  The conference will take place October 26th at the Haywood County Extension Center, across from the Mountain Research Station (MRS) in Waynesville, NC. The day will include an afternoon tour [...]

By | August 24th, 2011|Balsam woolly adelgid, Hemlock woolly adelgid, News|Comments Off on Reclaiming Hemlocks and Firs: A Symposium

Majestic Giants and Tiny Terrors

Call them one of “America’s  Most Wanted” invasive pests: the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA).  After arriving here from Asia in the early 1950’s, these pesky aphid-like insects have devoured their way through millions of hemlock trees and left a trail of “ghosts” through the forest. [More]

By | April 8th, 2011|News|Comments Off on Majestic Giants and Tiny Terrors

Did You Know?

How much do you know about the balsam and hemlock woolly adelgids? Here are some interesting facts about hemlocks, Fraser firs and the insects that attack them. Since all HWA are female, they reproduce asexually twice a year, which causes adelgid populations to increase dramatically.  One individual can lay up to 300 eggs yielding up [...]

By | February 8th, 2011|News|Comments Off on Did You Know?

ASTF Welcomes 2 New Staff Members

Ben Smith and Erin Mester have joined the Alliance for Saving Threatened Forests as new staff members. Ben Smith Ben Smith received a Ph.D. in Forestry from North Carolina State University in 2010. As a post-doc working with the Alliance for Saving Threatened Forests, Ben is based at the Mountain Research Station in Waynesville, [...]

By | February 8th, 2011|News|Comments Off on ASTF Welcomes 2 New Staff Members

Golden Leaf Foundation Provides Support for Christmas Tree and Hemlock Research

A collaboration of scientists joining forces against the balsam and hemlock woolly adelgids, insects that threaten Fraser fir and eastern hemlock trees, respectively, recently got new ammunition. A $65,000 grant from the Golden Leaf Foundation will allow the scientists to start developing gardens of woolly adelgid-resistant trees. Chaired by Dr. Fred Hain, forest entomologist at [...]

By | October 22nd, 2010|News|Comments Off on Golden Leaf Foundation Provides Support for Christmas Tree and Hemlock Research

Breeding a better Christmas tree: NCSU Researchers Seek to Battle the Adelgids

A pile of cottony-speckled logs sits prominently against the back wall of entomologist Dr. Fred Hain’s research lab in N.C. State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The logs are samples of a history of devastation for North Carolina’s Fraser fir, a native tree popular for its beauty both in the forest and as [...]

By | October 21st, 2010|News|Comments Off on Breeding a better Christmas tree: NCSU Researchers Seek to Battle the Adelgids