FRA Invites You!

INVITATION You are invited to an Open House at the Mountain Research Station (MRS) highlighting hemlock work in North Carolina to combat the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), an invasive pest that is killing hemlocks throughout the eastern range of the tree. Save the date, Thursday September 5, 2019, for a tour of the facilities of [...]

By | August 2nd, 2019|News, Uncategorized|Comments Off on FRA Invites You!

Predicting Spread of Invasives with Less Data

Researchers at the Center for Geospatial Analytics at North Carolina State University recently developed a new forecasting technology that can help predict the spread of invasives more quickly and easily than ever before. Read more: https://phys.org/news/2019-07-insect-pests-tracks.html

By | July 19th, 2019|News, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Predicting Spread of Invasives with Less Data

Forest Fragmentation, Restoration and Invasive Species

Humans are largely responsible for increasing the range and distribution of pest species. As people continue to change the landscape by converting forest land for development, agriculture, and other uses, scientists are trying to understand the effect that such fragmentation will have on forest ecosystems, including their susceptibility to invasive pests. Read more: https://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/compass/2019/07/11/effects-of-forest-fragmentation-and-restoration-on-invasive-species/

By | July 16th, 2019|News, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Forest Fragmentation, Restoration and Invasive Species

Tree restoration most effective strategy for climate change mitigation

According to a study lead by Swiss climate change ecologist Thomas Crowther, "the restoration of trees remains among the most effective strategies for climate change mitigation." Read more:https://science.sciencemag.org/content/365/6448/76

By | July 7th, 2019|News, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Tree restoration most effective strategy for climate change mitigation

An Army of Beetles Could Help Save Dying Hemlock Forests

BENT CREEK EXPERIMENTAL FOREST, N.C. — When the woolly adelgids come and descend on the forest, the eastern hemlock dies. It’s been like this since the insect was discovered in Virginia in 1951. The aphid-like pest spread north first, but by the early 2000s, eastern hemlocks in the southern Appalachians were being decimated by the [...]

By | September 16th, 2016|Uncategorized|Comments Off on An Army of Beetles Could Help Save Dying Hemlock Forests